Posts Tagged ‘ facebook ’

The Flipside of Information-Control on the Web

Today I read the following article:

On the evening of 25 November, Facebook.com disabled “We Are All Khaled Said” page which got more than 300,000 followers. The page was created after the 28-year-old Egyptian man named Khaled Said was beaten to death in Alexandria by two police officers who wanted to search him under the emergency law, according to El Nadim Center for Rehabilitation of Victims of Violence, local rights group.

The page administrator utilized the page to post updates on the flow of the case before the court and relevant information related to the incident that happened on the 6th of June 2010, as well as mobilizing people to join peaceful assemblies that took place against torture in Egypt and supporting victims of violence. …

http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/2010/11/25/egypt-facebook-disables-popular-anti-torture-page/

This story came to me via Twitter, in a retweet that read “Reminder: making Facebook your publishing platform gives Facebook the right to delete what you say” (DanGillmor, RT by cascio). This reminder reemphasizes the point I keep coming back to about web records: you don’t control your information once it’s on the web.  I’ve spent a lot of time underlining how once someone publishes information on the web it might as well be there forever, particularly in my paper about ECCA and in previous journal entries about Twitter and blogging.  But maybe that’s not entirely accurate, or at least it only illustrates half of the point.

The flipside of the issue of information-control on the web is that whoever owns the rights to the server controls the information, and thus the disposition of the record—the “heaven” of perpetuity and the “hell” of the shredder, as we’ve learned in class (though, when it comes to the web, I suspect in many cases—at least retrospectively—the descriptors “heaven” and “hell” are reversed).  The case of “We Are All Khaled Said” aptly demonstrates how the server owner controls the disposition of information, even when one administrator and 300,000 users lay some intellectual claim to it.  The information can just as easily be destroyed when the author would wish it saved, as saved when he/she would wish it destroyed.

The real point about web records is that whenever you publish information using a third-party, such as Twitter, or WordPress, or Facebook, or MySpace, etc, etc, you’re compromising certain intellectual property rights.  Obviously, as a user you can access your web space through these services and add, edit, and delete your information however you like.  But the service provider, the server owner, the third-party reserves the right to either freeze, save or delete any or all of the content you publish.  Typically, this ceding of your intellectual property is written plainly (though often obliquely) in the end-user agreement or statement of terms, the same place you’ll find statements that free the third-party from any liability as well as privacy statements.  Here’s an example from the Facebook Statement of Rights and Responsibilities:

 

Sharing Your Content and Information

 

You own all of the content and information you post on Facebook, and you can control how it is shared through your privacy and application settings. In addition:

 

1. For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (“IP content”), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (“IP License”). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.

2. When you delete IP content, it is deleted in a manner similar to emptying the recycle bin on a computer. However, you understand that removed content may persist in backup copies for a reasonable period of time (but will not be available to others).

http://www.facebook.com/?ref=logo#!/terms.php

While the statement claims that you “own” and “control” all of the information on your Facebook page, a careful reading makes it quite evident that it is Facebook that actually controls both the license and the final disposition of all your published content.

 

This is no different than the deletion of user comments by moderators on news sites or message boards.  And that’s why this issue lies in an expanding frontier of grey area: most people would agree that the owner of the website has the right to control what information is published there.  But who owns the social network?

Facebook Fraud

CNN.com | Fears of imposters increase on Facebook

facebook(CNN) — Without his input, Bryan Rutberg’s Facebook status update — the way friends track each other — suddenly changed on January 21 to this frightening alert:

“Bryan NEEDS HELP URGENTLY!!!”

His online friends saw the message and came to his aid. Some posted concerned messages on his public profile — “What’s happening????? What do you need?” one wrote. Another friend, Beny Rubinstein, got a direct message saying Rutberg had been robbed at gunpoint in London and needed money to get back to the United States.

So, trying to be a good friend, Rubinstein wired $1,143 to London in two installments, according to police in Bellevue, Washington.

Meanwhile, Rutberg was safe at home in Seattle.

OK, I’m only going to say this once. If you see a status message from me asking you to wire me money somewhere you didn’t even know I was going– DON’T DO IT. Seriously.

While it’s somewhat alarming that this sort of thing is happening, it’s somewhat more alarming that people are falling for it. It’s kind of like the Nigerian email scam all over again.